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What business topics or issues are most challenging to you right now?

Innovation Process

What online tools are the best practices for gathering innovation ideas from a large team (e.g., 4000+ member), assigning those ideas to SMEs (Subject Matter Experts) to determine if they should be implemented, and then implementing them? What is the best practice for designing a process that does not die under its own weight?

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22 likes

What business topics or issues are most challenging to you right now?

Jeremy Siegel's Economic and Financial Markets Update

Pardon me if this general speaking topic already has been suggested, but I suspect nearly everyone would love to hear Prof. Siegel provide a reasonably detailed, comprehensive economic and financial markets update along with a review of whatever current topic interests him the most. His regular finance class lectures were a high point of our two years at Wharton. We want Jeremy!

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18 likes

What societal challenges could be improved by the Wharton alumni network?

Wharton on Healthcare

Healthcare costs are pretty much going to bankrupt the U.S. economy if they stay on their current trajectory. Wharton alumni could take a non-partisan, business-oriented approach to this challenge. At least it would be interesting to get the discussion going among alumni and to have some of our experts on health economics weigh in with the relevant facts.

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15 likes

What do you most need to learn to be an even more effective leader?

Managerial courage

Developing the capacity to: not hold back anything that needs to be said but to remain collegial; providing current, direct, complete, and “actionable” positive and corrective feedback to others; letting people know where they stand; facing up to people problems on any person or situation (not including direct reports) quickly and directly; willingness to take negative action when necessary.

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10 likes

What societal challenges could be improved by the Wharton alumni network?

Financial Literacy

Is it too utopian to suggest there's merit in a business plan or a non-profit pursuing a good housekeeping seal of approval-like business for consumer-oriented finance vendors (banks, credit cards, mortgages, etc). The seal being an indication that finance products are clear and easy to understand.

 

Second idea - can we create a nation wide financial literacy volunteer program? Occupy Wall Street has highlighted some of the gaps in understanding of basic tenets of finance? i.e., How a loan works, What is a loan, Why a budget is important

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9 likes

What societal challenges could be improved by the Wharton alumni network?

Pension/Retirement strategies for mature markets

What might we develop as strategies for countries facing challenges around aging populations and poorly funded retirements/pensions? What can the combination of academic excellence at Wharton combined with the market expertise of alumni do to move the needle on this significant global issue?

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9 likes

What societal challenges could be improved by the Wharton alumni network?

Endowments in Non-Profits and Higher Education

An alien observing human life from afar might be puzzled by these weird financial institutions called "universities" that have inexplicable educational operations attached to them. What does it mean that Penn and the other Ivies amass huge fortunes and spend only 4 percent of them each year. One explanation is that they need big reserves to buffer business cycles. That might explain a billion or so. But, why do they need 10s of Billions. Doesn't hoarding cash imply that the institutions can not productively invest that cash? Stakeholders would take a very hard view on a company that hoarded so much cash and did not invest it productively. It is time for some clear economic reasoning to be applied to philanthropic capital and the financing of higher education.

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9 likes

Displaying 1 - 25 of 135 Ideas